How to make Yoghurt at Home and in the Past 1 Month with Karatay? There are also 25 comments to give you an idea. Recipe tricks, thousands of recipes and more... Türk butter at home, how to make karatay diet, karatay diet recipe, karatay diet food, what to eat in karatay diet, Karatay Cuisine, curd cheese, tomato paste, vinegar, tarhana, yogurt, Diet Recipes

1 Month with Karatay and Making Yoghurt at Home

Release Date: 15-08-2012
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Dear Sinem Karatay continues to share her diet recipes and experiences with us…

I know it's been a long time since I wrote. It has now been more than a month since I started the Karatay Diet. Meanwhile, in the middle of summer, I had a very serious, microbial throat infection and I had no time to write because of the things to do about school. I got better, I relaxed my schoolwork a little bit and I'm here again.

As I said, it has been more than 1 month since I started the Karatay Diet, or rather, eating and living as recommended by Canan Karatay, we can say 40 days. In this time period, I have become very used to eating this way. In total, I lost 5.5 kilos. I had some escapades in between, there were days when I couldn't walk, I couldn't pay attention when I was sick. But I am proud of having lost 5.5 kilos. It's 7 kilos left :) It doesn't seem like it will be very fast after that, but I'm sure that I will gradually reach the weight I want in the long run.

I have mentioned the subject of yogurt in my previous articles. Ms. Canan Karatay recommends you make your own yogurt if you can make it at home. At first, I was afraid of where I would find milk to make yogurt at home, what I would ferment it with, how I would mix it, so I bought it from home-style or village-style yogurts, and I even wrote this down.

yoghurt

I recently bought Canan Karatay's new book, Karatay Cuisine, and started reading it. In fact, after briefly explaining the simple rules and reasons explained in the other two books, the book includes many different recipes in accordance with the Karatay Diet and lifestyle. These recipes are not only recipes, but also describe how to easily make winter preparations that our grandmothers and grandmothers used to make, such as butter, tomato paste, vinegar, yogurt, curd cheese, tarhana. Considering that the butter I use is sent by my mother from the village, I buy the tomato paste homemade and my mother makes tarhana herself and sends it to me at the end of every summer, I am quite lucky. In the delicatessen next to the house, delicious curd cheeses are sold as well as a wide variety of cheeses. I was getting the home-village type yogurt as well, and it was delicious, but there can be no better yogurt than home-made yogurt. My mother buys milk from the milkman she has known for years (now the son of the same milkman) and makes yogurt at home. Home yoghurt is just the consistency I like, slightly watery, more sour than market yoghurts.

Recently, on the day I bought the book, there was no leftover village yogurt that I had bought earlier at the market. So I decided to try the organic yogurt sold in a glass bowl. It tasted pretty similar to my mom's homemade yogurt. I thought I'd buy this from now on, rather than the village type yogurt. When I got home, I read about making yogurt at home in the book and decided to try it again. I had a previous attempt that ended in failure. The next day, I bought another bowl of the same organic yoghurt from the market (1 bowl because it ends in 1 day:) and I also bought a bottle of daily milk. I fermented my yogurt in a glass bowl left over from the previous day with organic yogurt and daily milk and the result was perfect. Let's see the recipe:

  • 700 ml daily bottle of milk
  • 1-2 tablespoons of yogurt
  • A pot to boil the milk
  • A glass container for fermenting the yogurt
  • A large cloth to wrap the yogurt while it is fermenting
  • Wooden spoon

I used the glass bowls of the organic yogurts I bought to make yogurt at home. Since 1 glass bowl is 700 ml, I used 1 ml for 700 bowl of yogurt and 2 ml of daily milk for 1400 bowls of yogurt. If you do not know the volume of your container, you can measure the amount of milk you want to make by pouring the milk you will use into your container. We put the measured milk in a saucepan and boil it. Since we use milk daily, it does not need to be boiled for a long time as our mothers boil raw milk. If possible, you should turn off the heat as soon as it starts to boil. A foam and cream will form on it, we do not throw it away or strain it so that our yoghurt can be more viscous. We put the warmed milk in our glass containers and leave it to cool with open mouths. What I will say now is the very mother method, but otherwise it is difficult to regulate the temperature. Milk should cool down to our body temperature, that is, around 37 degrees. There is no need to use a thermometer to understand this, we put our little finger into the milk with the grandmother method and if it is at the same temperature, it means it's done :) If we are fermenting yogurt for the first time, we can use a yogurt that we like to taste (organic or village-house type would be better, prebiotics can also be tried), Although we have fermented before, we put 1-2 spoons of yogurt, which we separated from the last yogurt, into each bowl and mix it completely with a wooden spoon. We close the lids of the containers, wrap them with a cloth and leave them to wait in a corner at room temperature. In the book, it recommends waiting 6-8 hours, but I forgot the yogurt and left the house. In total, it remained wrapped outside for 10-12 hours. Fearing that it might have gone sour when I got home, but knowing there was nothing I could do, I put it in the closet to try my luck, and it stayed in the closet overnight. I was quite skeptical when I tasted the yogurt the next day, but it tasted perfect. On my second try, I waited for 10 hours with peace of mind, I think I will not wait any less from now on.

Tomorrow I will make my own yogurt for the third time. When I ferment 700 of the glass bowls (2 ml) I mentioned above at once, this yogurt is enough for me for 2 days. You can make more, but remember not to eat the same yogurt for more than a week. Because it is a home made yogurt, it starts to turn sour quickly. If you try to make yogurt when you run out of yogurt at home, you will have to buy yogurt from outside that day. Therefore, do not forget to make a new yogurt 1 day before the yogurt at home runs out.

When I wrote on Twitter that I was trying to make yogurt, I got feedback from my friends that when they put a little cream or milk powder in the milk, the consistency is better. I am very strict about milk powder, I should not use it, and according to Karatay, it should not be used. It seems like a natural cream can be added as daily bottled milks are not too oily compared to raw, freshly expressed milk. But it is necessary to make sure that it is unadulterated. The non-solid consistency of the yogurt I'm making right now suits my taste. If you want it to be thicker, you can add cream, or you can buy raw milk from a trusted place and ferment your yogurt after boiling it well, it's entirely up to you.

Text & Photograph: Sinem Çomarlı

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"1 Month with Karatay and Making Yoghurt at Home25 comments for ”

  • On January 03, 2015 at 23:23 am
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    I separated yeast from the yoghurt I bought from outside 1 week later, there is no yeast, it's like jellyfish.

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  • On December 17, 2013 at 23:23
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    It was a very useful article. good luck with your work...

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  • Sept. 03, 2013 at 11:55 pm
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    I have been making yoghurt at home for years. The yoghurts in the market never taste good. I knead at 4 hours in the summer and in 5-6 hours in the winter. It's okay :) As soon as I opened the bidet, I used to put it in the closet and put it in the closet. I heard a trick. When you open it, you can keep it in the freezer for 1 hour. )

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  • March 16, 2013 at 16:07
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    I've been making my yogurt with Sek milk's daily bottle of natural milk for a few years now. I have a thermos pot, I ferment the milk and when I close the pot, I wrap it with a woolen shawl that I do not use (even if I do not wrap it).

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  • March 05, 2013 at 00:20
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    Friends, if you ferment the yoghurt in earthen bowls (like a casserole), the result will surprise you. just be careful, the casserole is not glazed

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  • On February 22, 2013 at 14:29
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    Hello,
    I am very sorry for you and the people who gave you this idea, who mislead the public in a completely ignorant manner and caused them to be fed wrong and DANGEROUS.
    If you want, let me give you some clear scientific information about yogurt.
    Yogurt only consists of milk and two beneficial bacteria that can reproduce by living together in it, which is called "yeast" among the people.
    These bacteria are called lacobacillus bulgaricus and streptococcus lactis.
    These two bacteria benefit from each other in order to grow, and one of them creates the acidity of yogurt and the other creates its texture and flavor. However, when they work to turn milk into yogurt, the temperature they use is different for both. Therefore, adjusting both the acidity and the texture and flavor can only be achieved by finding the right temperature for both. It is very difficult to maintain this temperature in the home environment (the temperature can vary between 38 and 43 degrees depending on the desired structure and consistency. Like all living things, yogurt bacteria also have a life cycle. They are born, grow, develop, multiply, age and eventually die. The reproduction period of these bacteria is ( Activity) is 72 hours. In other words, it is unknown at what stage of life cycle the yoghurt bacteria made by transferring from yoghurt to milk are. Also, for a good, healthy and correct yoghurt, there should be 1 million of these bacteria in 10 gram of yoghurt and they must be alive and young. Since the mixing changes the structure of the bacteria (the thread of the necklace, which is like a pearl necklace, it splits into grains) it is no longer a yoghurt yeast but something else. Moreover, because the old yogurt has aged in it, there is no state to make yogurt. Moreover, since the temperature is completely adjusted by hand and a previous yogurt and new yogurt angle Since they are fermented in a cold and unhygienic environment (how many mold spores and dangerous real yeast spores are in kitchen and refrigerator environments), yoghurtization occurs, but it is not clear with which bacteria it was formed.
    Now, our respected teachers and you will show me the old days as an example. It's good, but the yogurts made in those days were not natural and good because they were made at home. It was good as they supply the yeast fresh every day. Right now, it uses fresh yeast every day in the yoghurts on the market, produces in an extremely hygienic environment, makes yogurt at temperatures that will keep the product at an edible acidity until the end of its shelf life, and packs it in hygienic packaging, cutting off contact with air and always keeping it cold.
    With my love

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    • On June 04, 2013 at 15:09 PM
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      It is clear which capital market the friend who wrote this comment serves. It is also very interesting that he throws mud at our traditional, centuries-old technique, which he calls grandmother's yoghurts. Wouldn't it be great if he wrote which pasteurized milk factory he represents while giving information to us ignorant people from scientific research. because he hasn't been able to explain scientifically :) by the way, I congratulate him, because he almost said insulting words, it's an interesting courage on social media. What is more interesting is why the friend who gave this yogurt recipe remained silent.

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    • on July 31, 2013 at 18:28
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      Gulay Ozcan. Our grandmothers and grandfathers lived in very primitive conditions. They even drank the warm milk they milked from their animals, and ate the vegetables they plucked from their branches, such as tomatoes, peppers and cucumbers, without "washing them". We are so clean now!!! And because we have been meticulous, our children become asthmatic, diabetic and cancer patients. We no longer have the red cheeks of our grandmothers and grandfathers, their children's runny noses, their shining eyes, their apple-like cheeks. If I'm going to be as healthy as them; I want to leaven yoghurt by groping from village milk that has been filtered and boiled without using a temperature. The yarns of industrialized products are also poured into the market. These were published on the website of the Ministry of Health. I agree with Ms. Asli Arikan. Since you are providing so much technical information, tell the company you work for or are affiliated with, so that we can know the brand that has employees who inform ignorant people like you vehemently :) Once upon a time, synthetic "melamine" was very popular and was very much praised. Oh, then it turned out that it contains cancer-causing substances. Likewise, ALUMINUM CONTAINERS suffered the same fate. This yoghurt fermentation business has also turned into this. Maybe we don't know the names of maya (whatever their Latin name is), neither my grandmother nor my mother. My grandmother, who is 89 years old, used to make and eat yogurt in a tinned copper pot, which we called “bakrac” until her last years. After a traffic accident at the age of 84, a platinum was attached to his hip and Dr. “Don't wait for him to walk. He walked 6 months after saying "he cannot stand up due to age from now on". At that time Dr. He researched his diet in amazement. The result was "YOGURT" and "Bread with Ayran". Yoghurt, which is a wonderfully delicious health resource, is made by using bacteria, the name of which he does not even know, together with the old and the young, in those unhealthy conditions. The deceased used to unplug the old-fashioned antique refrigerator most of the time :))) KNOWING CAN SOME TIMES HARD. Of course, if your main intention is to give information ;)
      I wish you healthy days.

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  • On February 22, 2013 at 11:39
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    Miss Nilay,

    We are waiting for you homemade butter recipe :)

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  • Oct. 03, 2012 at 18:53 PM
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    Hello, Ms. Sinem, I'm going to try yoghurt too, but what month are you on this karatay diet and how much weight have you lost?

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  • Sept. 13, 2012 at 09:35 pm
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    If you make your yogurt in small jars at the lowest temperature of the oven where only the light is on, you will see that it is more delicious. Boil the milk, it will not burn your hands, leave it when it drops to warm heat, jam, baby food, etc. Do not throw away the bottles, but ferment in them. You will not like the yogurt you buy from the markets. your friends will think you got it ready. try it. Put your tray in the middle of the oven, put a thick newspaper in it, like the amount of a daily newspaper. Put the milk bottles you have fermented on it with the mouth open. Turn on the temperature so that only the light is on. Its temperature is enough. Yogurt is ready in 4-5 hours. At the end of this period, remove the cabinet with its mouth open. Close the lids after about 2 hours, if you put them closed first, it will sweat, and it will spoil quickly.

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    • On February 10, 2015 at 12:41
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      I also follow the method you wrote, the result is amazing ;) My children love yogurt more and eat it abundantly.. The fact that the inside of the glass jars can be seen is also an advantage. You can keep it clean and odorless by wiping the inner walls with intermediate vinegar.

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  • on August 22, 2012 at 00:30
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    I can't follow your site much these days. What happened to your Dukan Diet? Can I learn why you started the Karatay Diet?

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    • on August 22, 2012 at 10:08
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      Hello Gülcan, dear Sinem who is on the karatay diet. We share his experiences in this section. I've lost 55 kilos, I don't continue to diet, but I do sports. Love…

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  • on August 15, 2012 at 21:55
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    Sinem, I forgot, as a 64 year old person, I can't lose weight as fast as you. I was 67.9, now my weight is 60.2, my goal is 58 and until the new year. Good night.

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    • on August 16, 2012 at 10:44
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      How beautiful! I think you have shown a great success, I lost the 5.5 kilos he lost in the first place because I gained it 6 months ago, but after that, the weights that have been in my body for years and it will be slow. You can be sure a much bigger success :)

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    • On November 12, 2013 at 14:58 PM
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      I am 23 years old, I have never lost weight in my life, I was very embarrassed when I read your article. I congratulate you, Mrs. Aynur. I hope it happens to me.

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  • on August 15, 2012 at 21:49
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    Good evening, I am one of those who choose the karatay diet and change their diet. I felt very comfortable. I lost 7 kilos in 5 months. I'm counting down at the moment. Since March, I've been making yogurt at home, I've been making yoghurt at home, since I'm in Ankara, I make it from AOÇ daily milk, I can find it in markets very easily. It ferments in 5 hours, I keep it uncovered for half an hour and I put it in the fridge. .I ferment every day, my wife and I finish the yoghurt made from 3.5 liter of milk a day. We cannot eat yoghurt from outside. It has to wait 1-6 hours in winter.

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    • on August 16, 2012 at 10:42
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      Buying AOÇ's daily milk in a box or bottle in Ankara is a great blessing :) In fact, my aunt said that if AOÇ makes it at home by mixing half a liter of goat's and half a liter of cow's milk, it tastes better. It is very difficult to find AOÇ in Istanbul, there are few places. But we can find daily milk of other brands, thank God.

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  • on August 15, 2012 at 16:04
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    good health to your hands.
    I have been fermenting my yogurt at home with raw milk every week for about 4 years. I can't eat yogurt bought from the market anymore :)
    You can try wrapping the jar/pot without closing the lid during fermentation, then it is possible to achieve a slightly thicker consistency.

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    • on August 15, 2012 at 17:08
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      Since the weather is hot, I've heard of one that ferments without wrapping it around, but I've never heard of one that ferments with the lid open :) As I said, I don't like yogurts with a very thick consistency anyway, but I will recommend this to those who like it more intensely. Health to your hands.

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  • on August 15, 2012 at 14:56
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    I've been making my own yogurt for a long time, and I've been following the Karatay diet for years. I wanted to read your article as soon as the two come together. A small point… To ferment yogurt, the degree of milk must be 46-47. This is the temperature that won't burn your finger. Cold fermented milk will not hold, yoghurt will not, in this case, do not be disappointed, pour the boiled water into a bowl and put it under your yoghurt container, wrap it again like crazy. It will ferment in half an hour, 1 hour. As a person who makes yogurt from 5 liters of milk every week, I can say that I gained a lot of experience. :)

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    • on August 15, 2012 at 17:07
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      Perfect for fermenting yoghurt faster :) Good luck to your hands..

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  • on August 15, 2012 at 14:08
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    Sinem Hn. hello… I am one of those who make my yoghurt at home for a long time. When I did, I realized that my initial concern was unfounded. A very simple and healthy solution. Of course, if your materials are good… I can recommend you a method my mother has been using for 30 years in terms of consistency. My mother takes the yoghurt she has kept for 1 day, takes what she can use, then folds a clean, lint-free cloth, which she calls a yogurt cloth, and places it in that space. The cloth absorbs the excess water, and the consistency of the yoghurt becomes solid as of the next day. I wish you ease…

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    • on August 15, 2012 at 17:06
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      Hello Ms. Zehra, thank you very much for your good advice. When you take a spoon of yogurt without placing a cloth, it leaves the remaining water and the yogurt starts to thicken. Since the juice of yogurt is also very useful, I can't bear to let a cloth absorb the water :) As someone who likes watery yogurt, when I want to strain it, I leave it on a very fine wire milk strainer for a few hours, all the water goes into the container under it and it becomes a thick yogurt. I don't throw away the water and use it :)

      Answer

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